Update on Legislation Proposed in California to Register IECs

by Mark H. Sklarow, CEO, IECA

What IECA Has Done

We have been monitoring events in Sacramento and the IECA Board of Directors has met to set Association priorities as we confront the nation’s first effort to legislate our profession. We have discussed the proposed legislation with other affected groups and organizational leaders; with government affairs experts and lobbyists; and we have communicated our sense of the proposed law both publicly, through all available media, and privately.

Changes to the Original Proposed Legislation

Over the past two months, the proposed legislation has been significantly amended and watered down. It seems that the legislators discovered the complexities involved in the profession and, in my view, chose to kick the can down the road. Among the most significant changes, at least as the written text of the law now exists:

  • The description of IECs as seeking to ‘influence’ admission decisions has been changed to ‘assisting clients in the process of applying to college.’
  • Previous indications that the law will apply to IECs working with even a single California student, regardless of where the IEC is located, have been stricken.
  • The previous requirement for IECs to submit tax forms quarterly has been removed.
  • References to submitting names of clients and their college matriculation have been removed.
  • Any reference to examining college matriculation lists of clients has been removed.
What Remains in the Legislation

The only remaining piece of the legislation is that a College Consulting Advisory Task Force will be established to examine the process and any criteria for IEC registration by January 1, 2022. Of course, all of these changes could be reinstated at a later time and other conditions for registration are likely to be developed.

Next Steps

IECA’s intent is to be at the table, voicing our objection to any political legislation we see as impinging on highly qualified IECs, supporting those proposals that make sense and could actually strengthen the field, while strongly advocating for IECA members.

We will keep you informed as new information develops, most likely in the fall.

Securing Students’ Success, not Admission, Makes IECA Unique

By Mark Sklarow, CEO, IECA

Recently, a small group of new independent educational consultants (IECs)—all college-focused—were gathered at an IECA event. Seeing me, they waved me over. Why, they wondered, did we not have the word admission in the organization’s name? I noted that the word admission didn’t appear in our name, our by-laws, our purpose statement, or any tag line at any point in our 40-year history. Jaws dropped.